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Shek Nga Shan, 540m in heights, lies between Sha Tin and Sai Kung which the both ridges link southward together the ridges of Buffalo Hill and West Buffalo Hill.

Shek Nga Shan (North ridge) - A trail for hiking in Hong Kong

Shek Nga Shan
Distance: 13.0 Km
Duration: 6.5 hours
Diff.:

4.0

Scn.:

4.0

Start: Bus 85M, 86K, 87D, 299X, 680 get off at Chevalier Garden. MTR Ma On Shan section, get off at Tai Shui Hang Sta

End: Minibus 1A to Choi Hung, 101M to Hang Hau; Bus 91 to Diamond Hill Railway Station, 299X to Sha Tin

The path climbing Shek Nga Shan is very steep which would require clambering.

Please see the content below or the map.

Due to Google changing the terms of Google Map, the daily usage rate will be limited. Please refer to the static map instead if the above map could not be displayed or used normally. I apologize for the inconvenience.

Static Map KML file
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Mui Tsz Lam Village

The trail starts by following Hang Tak Street toward the way to Tai Wai from Exit B of Tai Shui Hang Railway Station. Head it keeping to the left side. Passing through Tsung Tsin Secondary School, the trail deviates from the road and traces the left pathway. Slightly descend the path, it soon crosses the river along the bridge on the right which is laid some large pipes alongside. Afterward, follow Mui Tsz Lam Road to the left slowly up. Along the way, the hill spur of Shek Nga Pui rears up in the front far. Heading to the gate, it follows the left concrete path to Mui Tsz Lam Village according to the signpost. Follow the concrete path to the junction, turn right to Mui Tsz Lam Village (left to Mau Ping). Head it a bit, climb the left path a few steps up to the concrete flat land of the dismantled public toilet, then ascend the obvious path behind the flat land.

Along Mui Tsz Lam Road

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Shek Nga Shan

Along the muddy path uphill, it initially cuts through the bamboo forest then climbs the sylvan slopes. The path then turns very steep that would require clambering. Up to the mid-level, it suddenly opens up that the hills of Ma On Shan and Luk Chau Shan peer out. Afterward, it climbs along the stone river until coming to the bottom of the rocky wall. Follow the right path, it skirts the wall then straight climbs through the gap. Afterward it joins the muddy path. Futher up, the slope becomes tame. Beyond the shrubland, it leads up to the top of the first peak of Shek Nga Shan.

Note: The path climbing Shek Nga Shan is very steep which would require clambering and refering to the ribbon marks as guidance along the way. You are recommended to put on gloves.

Exit: If not to climb Shek Nga Shan, you could follow the left path directly to Mau Ping from the junction before entering to Mui Tsz Lam Village.

Related Trail : Mau Ping

The stone river

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The hills of Tiu Shau Ngam, Ma On Shan and Luk Chau Shan

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Overlook around, the northeast hills of Tiu Shau Ngam and Ma On Shan link together undulating from the left to the right. Looking to the right further, Pyramid Hill and the tablelands of Ngong Ping comes to your eyes quietly. Return the sight to the left from Ngong Ping, it is the hill of Luk Chau Shan which undulated ridge seems to be the chain before the chain of Ma On Shan lying behind. It is relaxed to overlook free horizontally, as if the scenery lively jumped from a beautiful picture. Look far to Luk Chau Rocky Forest, the huge rocks seem to be just a group of gravel. Fun Shui Forest beneath the hills has rich species of plants and insects, which are lush and thick to present various kinds of green. The nature is always great that could contains and tolerates every type of trees, grasses and other species in a same place harmoniously.

Continue to head the trail, it is obvious and contours along the undulate ridge up. The peak at the front is sharp like a blade. Look back to the previous peak, it seems to be a firm and upright rocky tower. Overlooking to the northwest, the concave depression between the left ridge and the right ridge of Shek Nga Shan stretches down to the valley of Turret Pass and Turret Hill. Cutting through the woods then being slightly down, it climbs to the next hill. Continue to head the trail down to the junction, then follow the left path uphill again. You could skirt the hill just along the right path. Afterward, the trail slightly descends to the valley on the right, then contours the hillsides up. Along the way gazing down to the right, the six hillsides like the same pattern undulate along the northwest ridge. Overlook to the left, Hebe Haven and Sai Kung Town could be seen in the mist. Further up, it comes to the hilltop of Shek Nga Shan.

The craggy rocks

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Overlook Sai Kung

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Look back the north ridge

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Buffalo Hill

Continuing on along the trail, it descends to the recession where is the path junction linking the northeast ridge and the north ridge of Shek Nga Shan. At that time, follow the left path to skirt along the hillsides (going ahead could climb the knoll then go to the same destination). After join the main path of the northwest ridge, head it to the left upward (right down to Turret Pass along the northwest ridge). Looking back to the junction of the two ridge of Shek Nga Shan, it seems to be the variation on the terrain from the junction linking the west ridge and the middle ridge of Kau Ngai Leng. Along the way uphill, it offers the distance view on Sha Tin, to the other side, over Sai Kung. The trail is then slowly up to the top of Buffalo Hill towering side by side to West Buffalo Hill on the right. Afterward, follow the forward path along the east ridge of Buffalo Hill downhill, roughly toward Hebe Haven. Passing through the huge rocky group, MacLehose Trail horizontally lying could be seen beneath. After the steep downhill, it joins MacLehose Trail.

    Exit:
  1. After joining the path of northwest ridge of Shek Nga Shan, you could follow it to the right downhill to Turret Pass and then turn left to Fu Sam Hang and Siu Lek Yuen, or right to return Mui Tsz Lam Village from the junction.
  2. After the downhill to MacLehose Trail from Buffalo Hill, you could follow the path at the front to Sam Fai Tin according to the signpost, it then leads to Hiram's Highway via Mang Kung Wo Road.

Related Trail : Buffalo Hill

The recession linking northwest ridges

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The ridge extends to Buffalo Hill

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Buffalo Hill and West Buffalo Hill

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Sai Kung Town

Along the MacLehose Trail to the left toward Mau Ping, it is gently down to cut through the woods. Head to the cross-junction beside the lawn, then follow the right path to Pak Kong according to the signpost. Going doing not far ahead, take the left ancient path at the junction. It winds along the hillside then slowly descends. Along the way, it passes through a buddhist temple on the left. After heading to the flight of concrete steps of Ma On Shan Country Trail, follow it to the right downhill to join Pak Kong Au Road. Along the road, it then leads down to the cross-junction of Po Lo Che Road. Afterward, follow Tan Cheung Road at the opposite side. Down to the junction, turn left downward. Heading to the next junction, deviate from Tan Cheung Road to trace the right fork, then follow the left path at the next junction until coming to the flight of steps at the end of the road. Finally, after descend the steps, head the concrete path to Yau Ma Po Street and then Hiram's Highway.

Exit: At the cross-junction of Mau Ping, you could return to Mui Tsz Lam by following the left path.

Along MacLehose Trail

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The lateral silhouette of Shek Nga Shan

Summary

Hiking along the undulated path of Shek Nga Shan, Sha Tin, Sai Kung and Ma On Shan could be seen at the same time. Nestling under the rolling peaks, you could experience for the vitality of the rich and lush trees, the birds and the butterflies in the forest. Perhaps, the most important thing is not what you have, but what you have ever treasured. I treasure the live scenery at present which would be able to see only from the past photos or screens in the future.

Text : Horace

Late Update : 30.11.2018

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